Ancient skeleton discovered on Antikythera shipwreck

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Archaeologists Brendan Foley, Theotokis Theodoulou and Alex Tourtas excavate the Antikythera Shipwreck skeletal remains, assisted by Nikolas Giannoulakis and Gemma Smith © Brett Seymour, EUA/WHOI/ARGO

GREECE - An international research team discovered a human skeleton during its ongoing excavation of the Antikythera Shipwreck (circa 65 B.C.) a ship discovered and salvaged in 1900 by Greek sponge divers and considered the largest shipwreck ever discovered.
The shipwreck, which holds the remains of a Greek trading or cargo ship, is located off the Greek island of Antikythera in the Aegean Sea. The first skeleton recovered from the wreck site during the era of DNA analysis, this find could provide insight into the lives of people who lived 2100 years ago.
Led by archaeologists and technical experts from the Hellenic Ministry of Culture and Sports and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), the team excavated and recovered a human skull including a jaw and teeth, long bones of the arms and legs, ribs, and other remains. Other portions of the skeleton are still embedded in the seafloor, awaiting excavation during the next phase of operations.
When first discovered, the wreck contained the Antikythera Mechanism—an astounding artifact known as the world’s first computer.
The Antikythera research team generates precise three-dimensional digital models of every artifact, allowing discoveries to be shared instantly and widely even if the objects remain on the sea floor. Several 3D models of the skeletal remains are available for researchers and the public to view on the Antikythera Project webpage at: http://www.whoi.edu