Forbes Prize Lecture 2010

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The 2010 Forbes Prize lecture was given by David Lowenthal, professor emeritus, Department of Geography, University College London. The 2010 Forbes Prize lecture was given by David Lowenthal, professor emeritus, Department of Geography, University College London.
More details on the Forbes Prize Lecture can be found here: Forbes Prize Lecture.
David Lowenthal has produced over half a century a wide range of influential lectures and publications on the significance and problems of conservation; he has made significant contributions to defining conservation goals, and served national and international heritage agencies and institutions, including UNESCO, the International Council on Monuments and Sites, the International Council of Museums, ICCROM, the Getty Conservation Institute, the World Monuments Fund, the Council of Europe, Europa Nostra, English Heritage, the U.S. National Trust for Historic Preservation, the National Trust of Australia, and the Norwegian Directorate of Cultural Heritage.
Reflecting this year’s IIC Congress theme, Conservation and the Eastern Mediterranean Professor Lowenthal’s Forbes Lecture, ‘Mediterranean Omens: Conservation Nostrums in Mare Nostrum’ will link the conservation of art and history to the care of the wider natural environment, and stress the needs for long term stewardship of both. Professor Lowenthal is a renowned and prolific author. His work has included the seminal book “The Past is A Foreign Country “ (Cambridge University Press) and topics concerned with landscape tastes and perceptions, as well as the relationship between history and cultural heritage. His studies have embraced North America, the West Indies and Britain. He is a specialist on the 19th century North American philologist, geographer and environmentalist George Perkins Marsh, whose work laid the foundations of the environmental conservation movement in the United States. Professor Lowenthal earned his PhD in history from the University of Wisconsin after receiving an M.A. in geography from the University of California, Berkeley in 1950, anda B.S. in history from Harvard University in 1944.