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Publish 3D models in "Studies in Conservation"

A 3D model of an archaeological site in Iraq © Jason Herrmann, published in Journal of Field Archaeology

By George Cooper

Routledge, Taylor & Francis, publisher of IIC’s peer-reviewed journal Studies in Conservation, have partnered with 3D content platform Sketchfab to develop an exciting new feature for articles published online. 3D models can now be published in the main text of an article. The pilot program makes Routledge, Taylor & Francis the first major publisher to incorporate 3D models within the HTML version of online journal articles, making Studies one of the first publications in conservation to offer this feature.

Iconic Cormac’s Chapel at the Rock of Cashel re-opens to the Public

Interior of Cormac’s Chapel at The Rock of Cashel. Image taken by Barry Nangle © The Office of Public Works (OPW)

On the 3rd of July, 2018, The Office of Public Works (OPW) Commissioner, John McMahon, welcomed the official re-opening of Cormac’s Chapel, an Irish Romanesque style building which forms part of the Rock of Cashel complex, following an extensive conservation project.

American Express Awards $1 Million to Threatened Cultural Heritage Sites Included on 2018 World Monuments Watch

Matobo Hills National Park, Zimbabwe; one of the eight sites that will undergo documentation and conservation as part of the American Express and World Monuments Fund initiative. Image by Lars Lundqvist. Original image can be accessed here. (https://www.flickr.com/photos/arkland_swe/5441487417/in/photolist-9hR3Cz-9MNa3m-suHj1H-9hR3qc-aWUxUM-amjnDk-HDeqHg-o8hsca-PxNNPt-3f7uGi-3iJemb-GHAkeS-3iJeaC-fLGVcW-JpZkx8-dE6eQk-JpZ5MX-RuviQz-22h8z3q-ZxFwgM-fgmmNR-82xfT8-23j6QZY-qFco1e-HdWUSA-hgc92z-9xu5SC-bx8Eex-bXokzF

On June 12, 2018, American Express and World Monuments Fund (WMF) announced $1 million in funding to support preservation efforts at eight endangered cultural heritage sites included on the 2018 World Monuments Watch. The funded sites face threats from the effects of natural disaster, climate change, urbanization, and neglect, and date from prehistory to the twentieth century. They were included on the biennial Watch to identify opportunities for collaboration and positive impact. Now, grants from American Express will make projects possible at the following places:

Rare Arnhem Land Bark Paintings on Show in Beijing

Mathaman Marika, Rirratjingu Mortuary Ceremony, 1967. National Museum of Australia © the artist’s estate, licensed by Aboriginal Artists Agency

Delicate and rare bark paintings from the National Museum of Australia’s signature collection will headline an unprecedented exhibition tour of Arnhem Land artworks across China in 2018.The Old Masters: Australia’s Great Bark Artists exhibition featuring over 150 artworks and objects opens at the National Museum of China in Beijing on 3 July 2018 and represents the most significant collection of Aboriginal barks to tour China.

Elizabeth Tower Original Colour Scheme to be Restored

Rendering of Proposed Colour Scheme from paint analysis, by Purcell © UK Parliament.

The clock dial frames and the hands of the Elizabeth Tower are to be repainted in a return to the original Victorian colour scheme. Samples of the famous landmark’s earliest paintwork have been analysed by team of experts, in order to establish a true picture of the original design. Completed in 1859, the design of the clock tower was undertaken by Charles Barry, the architect of the Gothic Revival Palace of Westminster. Barry also created the intricate ironwork for each of the dials – including the choice of Prussian blue and gold frames filled with white glass.

42nd Session of UNESCO World Heritage Committee

Photo caption: Sansa, Buddhist Mountain Monasteries in Korea is one of 19 new sites inscribed to the World Heritage List. Beopjusa Temple, Hall of Eight Pictures (01/01/2016) Photo provided through UNESCO and taken by CIBM ©CIBM. Copyright/usage policy: https://whc.unesco.org/en/licenses/13 and https://whc.unesco.org/en/disclaimer/#image Permanent URL: https://whc.unesco.org/en/documents/165811

The 42nd session of the UNESCO World Heritage Committee was held in Manama, Bahrain, June 24 – July 4, 2018. Chaired by Sheikha Haya Rashed Al Khalifa, this session included topics such as UNESCO’s Convention for the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage. The UNESCO “Revive the Spirit of Mosul” initiative was also highlighted during the session. Launched this past February, this initiative aims to help rebuild and revive Mosul, one of the largest cities in Iraq, having suffered devastating destruction from 2014 to 2017.

Attribution of Cinnabar Carved Lacquer Vase

“Dragon and lotus” vase (1), “The tree peony” vase (2), label of Forbidden City (3) © Mariia Kuzminykh

The Bohdan and Varvara Khanenko National Museum of Fine Arts, also known as The Museum of Western and Oriental Art in Kiev, was established in 1887 and houses the biggest collection of foreign art in Ukraine. The Eastern collection of the Khanenko Museum contains a number of carved cinnabar lacquer vases, but one of them is more peculiar than the others. This vase (1) has a cobalt-blue enameled brass body and carved cinnabar lacquer imagery depicting two flying dragons with lotus ornaments.

Restoring a Terengganu Al – Quran

The Terengganu Quran, leather cover, before and after treatment. Image courtesy of the Pahang Museum and Alex Teoh

By Alex Teoh

“It is from Terengganu that we find the most brilliant illuminated Quran in the whole of South East Asia”
-Annabel Teh Gallop

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